S.S. Yukon, Lost 1913, Sanak Island, Alaska

Vessel Particulars

Hull: Iron (127271)
Dimensions: 205.4 x 36 x 25
Tonnage: 688 gross
Power: Coal-fired Steam
Builder:
Launched: Philadelphia, 1879
Owner: Pacific Alaska Navigation Company

At about 6 p.m. on June 11, 1913, the steamer Yukon, bound from the Kuskokwim River to Seattle, stranded in a fog on the northwest end of Sannak Island, south side of the Alaska Peninsula, and became a total loss. The facts later developed showed that the vessel, approaching Unimak Pass from northward in a fog, had made land the previous afternoon which was supposed to be Akun Head, on the southwest side of the northwestern entrance to the pass, but which was actually Ugamak Island, on the south side of the southeastern entrance to the pass. The vessel had, therefore, unknown to the master, been set entirely through Unimak Pass by the current. The master, assuming that he had made land on the northern side of the pass, shaped his course to lead through the pass and

Circumstances of Loss

casualty Details

Incident Type: Grounding
Date of Casualty: 11 Jun 1913
Severity: Total Loss
Crew Aboard:
Passengers Aboard:
Recovery: Salvage Impossible
Captain: Archie McKay
Wreck Location: Known


Wreck Investigation

A marine court of inquiry was convened in Seattle to hear testimony concerning the accident.


The reef where the ship struck was named Yukon Reef in honor of the lost steamship.

and then to make Cape Pankof, 68 miles northeastward, sounding at frequent intervals; but, being 26 miles southeastward of his supposed position, he stranded on the reefs extending from the northwestern side of Sannak Island, and it was not until the following day that the master discovered his actual position.


From Safeguard the Gateways of Alaska: Her Waterways. USGS Special Publication No. 50, 1918.